Quietly

Standard
Quietly,
Quietly,
she waits.
Alone.

No longer does laughter
fill the air;
No longer does door
on hinges swing.

Quietly,
Quietly,
she waits.
Alone.

No longer does she
move with ease;
No longer does laughter
ring so free.

Quietly,
Quietly,
she waits.
Alone.

No longer does the
doorbell ring;
No longer does the 
guest swing in.

Quietly,
Quietly,
she waits.
Alone.

Brrring! 
shatters quietness;
Brrring! 
fractures aloneness.

Quietly,
Quietly, 
she smiles.
Connected. 

Hello?
Oh, beloved voice;
How are you?
warms lonely heart.


Quietly,
Quietly she speaks; 
Quietly, quietly
loves, lives.


 

My sweet, sweet mother

This poem was inspired by a phone call I had this morning with my sweet, sweet mother, now 86, who lives 450 miles away. I asked, “How are you doing, Mom?” I heard a shocking reply. I didn’t realize how hard mandated seclusion is for the elderly, for my mom who never seemed elderly.

Please, please, please visit or call your parent or friend or neighbor today! Help “shatter the quietness and fragment the aloneness” for them.

“Pure religion and undefiled is this, To visit the fatherless and widow in their affliction…” James 1:27a

I plan on writing about the conversation tomorrow in my blog. See you then!

About bjdonaldson

I'm an average woman who enjoys reflecting on life, writing poetry and ponderings, and having a good laugh. DIY, baking, and cycling are fun, too. If you visited me, I'd invite you in for a cup of coffee and a little chat. I am a Literacy Coach, Reading Specialist, and former classroom and Reading Recovery teacher at an elementary school. Getting up in the morning is not hard; I still love making a difference in the lives of children and teachers.

14 responses »

  1. Your poem left me in tears, thinking about all the elderly, who thrive because of their connections to the outside world through their church groups, quilting groups, card clubs, lunch groups, Silver Sneakers, and volunteer groups and are now sitting home alone. They are cut off from the very reason they get up and move each day. I am grateful for my 84-year-old mom who was willing to learn how to use a Smartphone and text back and forth with family members. Connecting is part of our daily routine. Thank you for this beautiful poem!

    Like

    • How wonderful that you are staying connected with your mom. Connection IS so important for us all, but especially the elderly. I also cried writing this poem. Thank you for sharing your feelings. I appreciate the comment.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. This poem is a reminder to CALL those we cherish who are alone and lonely. This season of isolation is very hard for parents and others. Connecting with others is an essential part of life. I’ll make some calls tonight.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thank you. I am so embarrassed by my inability to move beyond my own fears of illness; my demands as a parent and my new demands as a teacher of distant learning. I have not checked in with my parents, extended family, friends. I feel like I am not a ray of hope and optimism. I am feeling fragile and have an empty tank. Perhaps we can fill each other. Thank you for the reminder.
    Your poem with its powerful repetition is beautiful. I appreciate and value your careful word choice.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful poem! It captured the loneliness many of us are feeling. Glad you got a phone call from your mom to escape the loneliness for awhile. I wrote about FaceTiming with my best friend. Miss connections and spending time with her, but was nice today to connect through technology. Thank goodness for technology!f

    Liked by 1 person

  5. A text or FB message is just not the same as a phone call! We received direction from our district today that we need to call each student in our classroom next week and then every week thereafter until we return. I LOVE THIS! I have been posting everyday on my classroom FB group, but not all of my students have access to this and I can’t wait to talk with each of them every week. 🙂 Thanks for sharing this!

    Liked by 1 person

    • What a wonderful way to stay connected with your students. You are such an important person in their lives, and I know this will mean so much to each one. I can just imagine their happy and thrilled faces when they find out that you took the time to call them!! Wow! This is such a great idea; I will share it with my teachers, too, if you don’t mind? Thanks for your happy comment.

      Like

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